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WC Students Attend Institute for Emerging Minority Business Leaders

WC Alumnus a Founder of Intensive Two-Week Program

July 28, 2011

Juniors Clinton Black and Leroy Besong, senior Chris Castagno and May graduate Rebecca Waits, were among 60 college students from across the United States selected for to attend 17th annual Emerging Minority Business Leaders Summer Institute.

Juniors Clinton Black and Leroy Besong, senior Chris Castagno and May graduate Rebecca Waits, were among 60 college students from across the United States selected for to attend 17th annual Emerging Minority Business Leaders Summer Institute.

Four Wilmington College students spent two weeks this summer learning about business administration and developing comprehensive business plans that were judged for cash prizes.

Juniors Clinton Black and Leroy Besong, senior Chris Castagno and May graduate Rebecca Waits, were among 60 college students from across the United States selected for to attend 17th annual Emerging Minority Business Leaders Summer Institute held at West Liberty College, Wheeling, W.Va., in June.

The program is designed to develop and empower students from a wide variety of ethnic, economic and cultural backgrounds to become the next generation of entrepreneurs and technology leaders for the advancement of American society.

Tyrone Taylor, a 1975 Wilmington College graduate and current trustee, has been an institute leader since its inception in 1995. He is founder and president of Capitol Advisors on Technology, and former NASA employee and director of the National Defense Industrial Association’s Small Business Division.

The EMBL Institute was created to cultivate young entrepreneurial talent and generate a pool of diverse and innovative thinkers capable of commercializing technologies to create value for the American marketplace.
The EMBL program, which is run by run by West Liberty University, is in partnership with the Minority Business Development Agency.

Angela Mitchell, associate professor of business administration, was impressed that the institute named four WC students in the very competitive selection process. She said WC awarded the students three upper division credit hours for the “intensive” summer course.

In addition to attending classes, the student conducted extensive research as part of teams that developed business plans for a technology-based business.

Upon presenting their plans, Black’s team took first place and a $5,000 prize while Besong’s was second ($5,000) and Waits’ team third ($2,000).

Additional benefits of the Emerging Minority Business Leaders Summer Institute are to provide networking resources to potential entrepreneurs, develop student professional and leadership skills to succeed in the new economy and promote public awareness of the need to include all segments of the population in entrepreneurship and technology innovation.