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MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. TEACH-IN CALENDAR - 2009

Each year Wilmington College offers a series of events, activities, conferences, and class lectures/presentations that focus attention and reflection on the values promoted by Martin Luther King, Jr.     Peace, justice, tolerance, non-violent protest, and civil rights also are valued by Quakers and are implicit in the mission and purposes of the college. The TEACH-IN message is powerfully communicated through the multiple lenses of diverse disciplines and through the multiple facets of our lives. This chronology bears witness to the high priority placed on these values by the Wilmington College community.

Monday, January 19, 7:30 p.m.  The annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Campus/Community Celebration in the Hugh G. Heiland Theatre, Boyd Creative Arts Center, Wilmington College.   Family friendly, Everyone Invited, Free Admission.  OUTSTANDING SRO ATTENDANCE FOR AN INSPIRATIONAL PROGRAM!


OTHER EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES:

Friday, January 16, 2009:  Ken Lydy’s Effective Speaking Classes will view a video of MLK's "I Have a Dream” speech" and analyze King’s effective delivery techniques.


Friday January 16, at 6:00, Keep the Dream Alive Program at Warren Correctional Institution.

Sharon Howard, WDTN Dayton Anchor Guest Speaker. UMOJA Men's Chorus and King Choir participants from Dayton and Cincinnati will perform selected works, directed by Cathy Roma.


Third Saturdays, starting January 17: Stress-reduction is an integral part of creating peace, so the Peace Resource Center is sponsoring a Peace Clinic the third Saturday of every month, starting January 17, from 9:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m. Local Reiki practitioners will provide 20 minute sessions of mediation and Reiki. The Clinic is free, and is open to the Community, Wilmington College students, staff and faculty.

Meditation is a practice of quiet stillness that has many variations and applications for us to explore. All forms of meditation lead us to inner relaxation. Reiki is a technique developed in Japan and the kanji (symbols) for the word translate into universal life force guided by the Divine. The notion of universal life force is explained to Americans as the life force that animates humans and makes plants grow. The concept of Reiki is to channel this life-force into ourselves, by way of the Divine Creator. It is best to experience the relaxation of Reiki, words are only poorly used symbols to describe a feeling that God creates. Both Reiki and meditation are only pathways to help us find our place of inner calm, just two pathways of many available in the world. The peace clinic is a place to experience if Reiki or meditation is a way you might use to find a path to inner calm.

For more information contact Charlotte Pack at the Peace Resource Center, ext. 371 or charlotte_pack@wilmington.edu.


Sunday January 18, 2009 at 6:00, The Dayton ML King Musical, featuring a 100 voice choir (including Wilmington community members, college graduates, and staff) at the Victoria Theatre. PLEASE FIND YOURSELF THERE to support this diverse, multi-cultural choir of all ages. Directed by Catherine Roma and musical cohort Bishop Todd O'Neal.


Monday January 19, 2009 at 12:00 NOON in Cincinnati.  The annual Martin Luther King city-wide commemorative program, after the march, includes music and a guest speaker. The Voices of Freedom will perform 8 diverse musical numbers to add to the festivities, directed by Cathy Roma and Bishop Todd O'Neal.


January 20: Eng 101 T/Th 9:10-10:25: Letter from a Birmingham jail.  The class will attend the Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Celebration and then will journal about the letter and program., followed by class discussion on 1/20. Assignment: Write a paper comparing and contrasting the three experiences.

Dr. Gloria P.Flaherty, Professor, Emerita of Education, Wilmington College of Ohio


January 20:  Eng 215 T/Th 2:30-3:45 Picture books about MLK: MY BROTHER MARTIN; MARTIN'S BIG WORDS will be read aloud in class on 1/20 (All welcome to come to classes on 1/20).  Written assignment:  Based on Eng 215 criteria, evaluate these two books concerning their quality as literature for children and as multicultural lit. 

Dr. Gloria P.Flaherty, Professor, Emerita of Education, Wilmington College of Ohio


January 21 and 22: In honor of Dr. King and his legacy, the Center for Service & Civic Engagement is hosting a several service opportunities.

--Wednesday, January 21,  and Thursday, January 22, The Center will be running a mini service recruitment fair in Pyle Center during the lunch hour. Tara Lydy will be recruiting students to be a part of some of the Center’s commitment programs such as: AmeriCorps* M3C New Horizons Program, College Club, & SLEB (Service Leader Executive Board).

--The Center staff also will be recruiting faculty, staff and student participants for our next blood drive (2/19) as well as Relay for Life teams.

--Saturday, January 24, Wilmington College student and staff volunteers will are working with the YMCA on Clean-up project 9:00 AM -Noon. We will be doing a major cleaning in the weight room and possibly painting a conference room. Interested volunteers should stop by the tables in Pyle Center on Wednesday or Thursday or stop by the CSCE (Center for Service & Civic Engagement).


Wednesday, February 18, 2009: 7:30 p.m.: T. Canby Jones Meetinghouse, Quaker Heritage Center:  Lest We Forget: Silent Voices: Film Showing and Discussion

Lest We Forget: Silent Voices ( http://gosprout.org/film/info30.htm) chronicles the first-person histories of people who lived in Ohio state institutions during the last years of institutionalization and the long journey home that is continuing today. While based in Ohio, the stories have national significance as a civil rights movement.

The film (which was shown at the Sprout Film Festival in 2008 - http://www.gosprout.org/film/) was based on Lest We Forget, a statewide initiative in Ohio to record and preserve the first person histories of people labeled mentally retarded or with other developmental disabilities who lived in state-operated institutions immediately preceding and during the de-institutionalization of these facilities. Families, advocates and professionals who were a part of this little known civil rights movement from segregation to integration also shared their stories.

We will be joined for discussion after the film by Judy Leasure of Partners for Community Living, who conducted interviews and was involved in the making of the film.

This is a great opportunity for psychology and social work students!! More information:  Ruth Dobyns, (937) 382-6661 x 719 or ruth_dobyns@wilmington.edu


FEBRUARY -- BLACK HISTORY MONTH -- Schedule of Activities - All Welcome to Attend!:

Tuesday, Feb. 3: 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., Pyle C/D. Keynote speakers highlight the importance of Black History Month and why college students today have an obligation to know this study and be activists in their own families and communities.

Saturday, February 7, 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. FIELD TRIP TO THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL & HISTORICAL MUSEUM, Wilberforce, Ohio. For all students.

Tuesday, February 10, 7 p.m, Pyle Center C/D. The Honorable Judge Jefrey Payton, Mansfield, OH will discuss his own journey "From College to the Court Room."

Friday, February 13, 11:30 a.m. - 1p.m. Dr. Forest Wortham, Director of Multicultural Student Programs, Wittenberg University, discusses "The Roots and Significance of Barack Obama's Presidency."

Monday, February 19, 7 p.m., Pyle Center C/D. Black History Month Movie: Rosewood.

Thursday, February 19, 7:30 p.m. Pyle TOP. "Kick N-Flava" from Dayton, Ohio will perform the history of Black music.

Monday, February 23, 7:30 p.m., Pyle TOP: Annual African Village variety performances sponsored by Wilmington College Black Student Initiative (BSI). Music, dance, poetry, food, T-shirts, keynote speaker.

Friday, February 27, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., Pyle C/D. Annual Black History Month Luncheon with soul food menu. Call the Office of Multicultural Affairs for reservations, x335.


February 2 through March 2: LECTURE SERIES ON 'IF WAR IS NOT THE ANSWER, WHAT IS?'

There will be a series of five lectures this coming semester on the above topic. They will be held on Monday nights at 7:30 during February and March. The lecturers are all Quakers and, as indicate below, several of them work at the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) in Washington, DC. FCNL is the oldest church lobby in DC and is now the largest peace lobby there. Following are the plans and a brief description of each speaker.

Monday, February 2: Joe Volk is the Executive Director of the Friends Committee on National Legislation in Washington, DC and a member of the Wilmington College Board of Trustees. After working for the American Friends Service Committee for 18 years he became the director of FCNL. During his tenure the organization has expanded in numerous ways. The new FCNL building is the first green building on Capital Hill.

Monday, February 9, 2009: 7:30 p.m., McCoy Room, Kelly Center. "If War Is Not the Answer, What Is? Progress on the Journey" with Mary Lord.

As we work for peace, we stand on foundations of peacemaking built over generations.  Mary Lord will highlight some of the successes that make war not only not the answer, but less likely than it was, and that point the way ahead.  Mary served as the Associate General Secretary for Peace and Conflict Resolution with the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC, www.afsc.org) from 2001 to 2007.  She directed the PeaceBuilding Unit, which was responsible for AFSC’s education and advocacy on issues of US foreign and military policy.  AFSC is the humanitarian, peace and social justice organization of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in the United States.

Monday, February 16, 2009: 7:30 p.m., McCoy Room, Kelly Center. "If War Is Not the Answer, What Is? Just Getting Started: A Strategic Outline for Long-Term Peace Work."

To do better work for peace, Chuck Fager urges that pacifists learn to think like warriors.  Chuck directs a Quaker peace project next door to one of America’s largest military bases.  He believes that many of the key strategic principles of successful warfare can be successfully (and peaceably) adapted to long-term antiwar work.  In other words: to make peace, it’s time to study war some more. Chuck is the Director of Quaker House.  As a part of this work, he has been a member of the planning group which became QUIT: The Quaker Initiative to End Torture, as well as a founding member of The National Religious Coalition Against Torture.  Quaker House has been a front-line Quaker witness project for peace and GI rights in Fayetteville, North Carolina, since 1969.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009: Chuck Fager, Director of Quaker House in Fayetteville, NC, and guest speaker Monday night for the "If War Is Not the Answer..." series, will be in Pyle C&D on Tuesday, Feb. 17, at 12 noon for an informal BYOLunch.  All are welcome!

Monday, February 23, 7:30 p.m., McCoy Room, Kelly Center: Rick Polhamus, a member of Christian Peacemaker Teams, speaks on "Getting in the Way." Through peacemaking discipleship we are led to proactively intervene and get in the way of violence and by intervening in the violence we discover a deeper meaning of discipleship that leads us on a path to a different way of living and therefore resolving conflict.

Monday, March 2, 7:30 p.m., McCoy Room, Kelly Center: Bridgette Moix, a legislative Secretary at the FCNL, speaks on "A New Foreign Policy Toolbox." What tools are needed to help prevent rather than fight wars? Bridget will discuss recent trends in the militarization of U.S. policy and how a new administration and Congress could invest more wisely in our civilian tools of diplomacy, development, and international cooperaton. Bridget specializes in the prevention of war and especially the prevention of nuclear war. She has worked with Oxfam America, the Quaker United Nations Organization, the Quaker Peace Center in Cape Town, South Africa and more recently at the Casa de los Amigos in Mexico City.

For more information:  D. Neil Snarr, Ph.D.    E-mail: neil_snarr@wilmington.edu


Thursday, February 19th: Blood Drive, 9:00am until 4:00pm in the McCoy Room, Kelly Center. Give of yourself, give of your time.

You can sign up today by going to www.donortime.com. They really appreciate people who register ahead of time. The Wilmington College Wellness and Health Promotions Committee is sponsoring this drive and will be holding a drawing for anyone that comes and shows their support and donates. Lucky participants will win one of three $25 gift certificates for Max and Erma's. So come on out and bring a friend Thursday, Feb. 19th from 9am- 4pm in Kelly Center.

Thursday, February 19th, 6 a.m. -- ...: Share your strength and energy to help others. Big food delivery to "Your Father's Kitchen" food shelter. It will be a great day to make a difference in our community. If you would like to help with the food delivery to "Your Father's Kitchen," a shuttle will be offered from the Center for Service and Civic Engagement starting at 6:00AM.



April 2 through 16:  HIS 111 with Vinny Prince -- the Civil Rights Era in U. S. History.  Dr. Prince will incorporate the Civil Rights Era in his lectures on the Fifties and Sixties to emphasize the Movement and its actors in the context of the times.


MUS201 (Music in World Cultures, 1:00) and IDS 425 (at 3:00 and 6:30), Cathy Roma will play music by Sam Cook, Marvin Gaye, Nina Simone, and others, all related to the popular music side of Civil Rights Movement.


MLK TEACH-IN CALENDAR Compiled by Jean Mulhern and Patti Kinsinger, members of the MLK, Jr. Planning Committee. Additions may be sent anytime during the Spring 2009 term to library@wilmington.edu