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Student Volunteers Build Raised Garden Plots at Cincinnati's Temple Sholom

Garden Shaped Like Star of David

April 14, 2013

Staubach’s contingent was comprised of WC students Rebecca Miller, Rachel Beck, Whitney Rymer, Jess Sheldon, Brittney Johnson and Jalyn Thomas.

Staubach’s contingent was comprised of WC students Rebecca Miller, Rachel Beck, Whitney Rymer, Jess Sheldon, Brittney Johnson and Jalyn Thomas.

Volunteers from Wilmington College spent their Sunday (April 14) transforming a muddy patch of grass into seven raised garden plots shaped like the Star of David at Temple Sholom in Cincinnati.

The six students and two volunteers led by Tony Staubach, project manager for WC’s Grow Food, Grow Hope initiative, constructed the 600 square foot garden that will be known as Gan Sholom — Temple Sholom’s Garden of Peace.

Temple Sholom plans to grow food in the plots for religious ceremonies and donate any additional produce to a food pantry in Cincinnati.

Staubach’s contingent was comprised of WC students Rebecca Miller, Rachel Beck, Whitney Rymer, Jess Sheldon, Brittney Johnson and Jalyn Thomas, along with Nellie Ashmore, an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer with Grow Food, Grow Hope, and Earlham College graduate Joel Hogle. The latter two helped supervised the students in removing the sod.

(LEFT) The raised garden plots depict the Star of David.

Christopher Eli Kraus, visiting instructor in Jewish education at Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion, praised the group for their hard work and dedication.

“The students were outstanding. They had a great attitude,” he said, noting his first contact with Grow Food, Grow Hope was hearing WC President Jim Reynolds’ presentation about Wilmington College at Hebrew Union College last fall.

Intrigued with Grow Food, Grow Hope’s interest in increasing local food capacity, Kraus shared Temple Sholom’s ideas with Staubach, who created an action plan and budget for the project. The next step was securing volunteers and shovels in the ground.

“I would like to publicly thank the students for their amazing work,” Staubach said. “Building a community garden shaped like the Star of David was not an easy task and I am grateful for all they did.” he said.

Additional work at the site is planned for later this spring and summer.