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Issues & Artists Series to Look at Film and Social Change

Program Titled 'A Talk by Susan Florries, A Filmmaker'

March 19, 2013

Filmmaker Susan Florries.

Filmmaker Susan Florries.

Filmmaker Susan Florries will discuss the production of films that promote values and social goals during a program at Wilmington College March 27, at 7:30 p.m., in Hugh G. Heiland Theatre.

It is the final event in the 2012-13 Issues & Artists Series. The program is free of charge.

Florries’ presentation, titled “A Talk by Susan Florries, A Filmmaker,” will discuss the role of film in creating social change.

“Film is a very powerful tool of communication,” she said. “Combining moving images, sound and music it activates several of our senses and, depending on the content, quite large parts of our brain.

“At the same time, watching films and television can put us in a kind of meditative state, allowing information to be absorbed without reflection. This, combined with other factors, makes film a powerful tool of propaganda, and a great tool to inspire constructive social change.”

Florries sad that, no matter how well-intentioned the filmmaker may be, the artistic medium of film is, in fact, inherently subjective.

“Film never shows reality as it completely is,” she said. “Film is instead an artistic interpretation of reality.

She noted that we live in politically intense times, where many divergent sides try to win our opinion.
“In order to be a functional citizen of a particular country, as well as the globe, it is important to know one’s own opinion and where it came from,” she said.

She will show examples from the history of film, as well as contemporary film, to highlight how it influences culture and improve critical thinking abilities.

“Critical thinking is essential to be able to effectively evaluate and assess one’s own opinions,” she said.

“Together we will discover and discuss how film affects us, how we can use it to spread messages which we believe in — without being manipulative — and how we can build up our defenses against manipulation by others, whether intended or unintended.”